Mistletoe is strongly associated with Christmas, but did you know Mistletoe grows in Rushcliffe?

Last year Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Strategy Implementation Group (RNCSIG) carried out a Mistletoe survey, which was very successful and generated over 25 records, 14 of which were from locations in West Bridgford.

We now know that Mistletoe grows in Aslockton, Cropwell Bishop, Edwalton, Gamston, Keyworth, Lady Bay, Radcliffe on Trent, Ruddington Tollerton and West Bridgford. RNCSIG wants to find out how common it is in those areas and if it grows elsewhere in Rushcliffe.

We are interested in mistletoe because it supports a wide range of wildlife, some of which can be rare and adds value to the biodiversity of an area. Winter is a particularly good time to spot it in the trees and it has a characteristic appearance, as illustrated by the photo of Mistletoe in a West Bridgford tree.

If you are new to the survey and suspect that Mistletoe is growing in a local tree, please let RNCSIG know by completing the online record at Also, if you participated last year and spotted some new locations we’d also be very pleased to hear from you.

Some mistletoe facts:

  • In Britain it grows mainly in the SW Midlands of England.

  • Most of the seasonal mistletoe harvest comes from traditional apple orchards – apple being mistletoe’s favourite host tree. 

  • Mistletoe’s other primary habitat is in gardens where it is usually planted on fruit, particularly apple trees. It also grows on many other trees including pear, lime and silver-birch.

  • There is some evidence that they are species specialist and so their seeds germinate more readily on the species that the parent plant is growing on.

  • It is a parasitic plant and is known as a hemiparasite as it still uses photosynthesis to create energy. of Form

Treswell Award for Local Member


Every year the Trust gives the Treswell Award in recognition of long service of a volunteer. The award is named after the first woodland the Trust ever purchased and first presented it to John McMeeking who was heavily involved in that acquisition (and indeed many other sites). This year it was presented to a local member namely Gordon Dyne for his work as Reserve Warden at Wilwell Farm Cutting Nature Reserve,  with the South Notts Local Group, Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Strategy and as a Trustee of Notts Wildlife Trust over a period of over 20 years. 

Wilwell Nature Reserve Open Day

Come and see some of Rushcliffes fabulous wildlife heritage. Wilwell Farm Cutting Nature Reserve will be running it`s annual Open Day on Saturday 3rd of June with a programme of guided walks round the reserve looking at the sites varied display of summer wildflowers. From 10 till 4 with a regular programme of guided walks round the site and also a nature table. The site walks programme with Gordon the Warden is as follows 10 am, 11.30 am 1.30 pm and 3 pm.

For a map and more info about the reserve go to Wilwell Factsheet for a downloadable pdf.

This is part of a programme of wildlife walks and visits being run in the Rushcliffe area by volunteers on behalf of Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust. For more details of other walks go to the Diary Tab – Out and About.with Wildlife

The reserve is on the B680 running between Wilford and Ruddington (NG2 7UT), the entrance track is just by the ring road bridge and will be signed. Car parking available.

Rushcliffe Service Level Agreement

For many years now Rushcliffe Borough Council has been supporting Notts Wildlife Trust in carrying out nature conservation related work around the Borough. Particularly in helping to set up and support Friends of Groups, wildlife education visits and running the successful Rushcliffe Nature Conservation Forum.  In helping to fund this work Rushcliffe created a model that NWT would like to encourage all local councils to follow and indeed some have.

As part of Service Level Agreement NWT produces an annual report of both its work funded by RBC, but also outlining its other work locally such a management of it`s own nature reserves, as well as the activities of the South Notts Local Group promoting an interest in wildlife and nature conservation.

A copy of the report is posted here and it gives a great insight into the variety of work, often unsung, that Notts Wildlife Trust undertakes locally Service level agreement report 2016 (1)

Grizzeled Skipper Project

Rushcliffe is the location for a number of Grizzeled Skipper butterfly colonies at the northern end of it`s range, with known populations on the Bingham Linear Park, East Lake section of the Great Central Railway and at Langar airfield.The GS Project run by Notts BAG and Butterfly Conservation is seeking to improve those habitats to maintain and hopefully grow the population.

Attached is a report on the project from 2012 to 2016 the-grizzled-skipper-project-2012-to-2016-1

Also attached are details of the 2016/17 GS work party programme nottsbag-grizzled-skipper-practical-work-poster-2016-17_v2